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cosettefauchelevents:

what if they took west side story and made a version where it was set in verona in the 1400s and instead of gangs there are two powerful italian families. i just think that would be really cool

(via communicationsinbinary)

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goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

(Source: NPR, via owlmylove)

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qwanderer:

thisisevenharderthannamingablog:

girl-farts:

kingcheddarxvii:

notviolet:

Chris Pratt Interrupts Interview To French Braid Intern’s Hair

SHUT THE HELL U P

this man has gone too far

damn

Where does Marvel FIND these people?

Imagine - Chris Pratt and Jeremy Renner show up to your door the night of prom and your parents are like WHY DO YOU HAVE TWO DATES AND WHY ARE THEY SO BIG AND BEEFY AND INTIMIDATING but Chris is just like “Nah I’m hair” and Jeremy raises his hand and says “And I’m makeup”

(Source: chrisprattdelicious, via owlmylove)

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bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

(Source: totallynotablogger, via soul-assassins)

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"The VA operates the largest integrated health care system in the nation, treating nearly 6.5 million patients each year. According to veterans with whom I have spoken, veteran service organizations that represent millions of veterans, and independent studies, the quality of care provided by VA, once veterans are in the system, is good. The crisis that we currently are facing is one of access, getting veterans into the system in a reasonable period of time. Some of my colleagues are concerned that the proposal Sen. McCain and I developed, and a similar proposal passed in the House, will cost significant sums of money. They are right. The sad truth, however, is that war is an extremely expensive proposition – in terms of human life, human suffering and financial cost. Taking care of veterans is a cost of war. It’s that simple."

Bernie Sanders

(via azspot)

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swolizard:

hailsagann:

swolizard:

If you see my selfies and don’t question whether you wanna fuck me or not you should probably go to the doctor for a checkup and see if you’ve got a pulse still

I don’t question it. Still alive. Just not into dudes.

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durrymuncher:

we have three distinct races in this fantasy story: white people, dwarves: who are sort of like… short white people, and elves: slightly taller-than-average white people with pointy ears

(via owlmylove)

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ace-enjolras:

I don’t think writers realize that “strong female character” means “well written female character” and not “female character who punches stuff and shoots stuff”

(via owlmylove)

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cumaeansibyl:

wretchedoftheearth:

wretchedoftheearth:

i really hate reading things that talk about how women stayed at home, were housewives, etc. when that was literally never true of most black women in the US

i mean by all means, talk about it, but be specific about which women you’re talking about

I like it when people talk about how women weren’t allowed to have jobs — right, because maids didn’t exist. I mean, women had all kinds of other jobs too, but maids are a really really obvious example of working women that people somehow forget all the time.

(Of course if you dig down you come to find out they were talking about Real Jobs like classy white men do, not gross manual labor which is for poor people and does not count.)

(via scoundreling)